FDA rebukes Lilly for Cymbalta promotion — pigs fail to fly, hell remains unfrozen and Cathal Grant keeps perscribing this drug like water, who is he trying to help looks like Eli Lilly who pays him (total drug company payments to Cathal Grant $151,474.00 since 2010) to push this drug off on you if you need it or not, even though studies have proven this drug is no more effective than a sugar pill.

In our experience Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas, will tell you need Cymbalta for your “so call depression”  (his favorite canned diagnosis) he claims you have  is “depression” without performing one medical test on you without the use of accepted medical test based in true medical science and cannot be proven by any medical test (with a blood test, x-ray, urine test, biopsy etc.) known in modern medical science today, to evaluate his patients in five minutes and then prescribes a drug, in our opinion you chances of getting a drug from Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas, when you see him in five minutes is about 100%, and look below how he has been paid by the drug companies to make sure you get a drug when you see him. In our experience he will give you a drug that does you no good and in many cases can make you worse, and is toxic to you body, a detail Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas, never tells you about.

60 minutes segment on Antidepressants Are No Better Than Placebo or Sugar Pill

 

Drugs Make Some Depressed People Worse Cymbalta addressed in this video:

 

 

The FDA Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising, and Communications has issued one of its increasingly rare enforcement letters, calling Eli Lilly (NYSE:LLY) to task for overstating the efficacy of its drug Cymbalta in a “professional mailer” sent to physicians. The letter said:

This mailer is false or misleading in that it overstates the efficacy of Cymbalta and omits some of the most serious and important risk information associated with its use. Therefore, the mailer misbrands the drug in violation of Sections 502(a) and 201(n) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (Act), 21 U.S.C. 352(a) and 321(n), and FDA implementing regulations.

Sending so-called “untitled” letters, like this one, and the theoretically more serious “warning letters” have traditionally been the FDA’s only power to do anything deceptive drug advertisements and promotional materials. Under the FDA Amendments Act of 2007 recently signed by President Bush, the FDA has gained the power to impose monetary “civil penalties” for violations of the regulations concerned drug ads — up to $250,000 per violation, (“up to” being the operative words here) maxing out at $500,000 for a single company in a three year period. Arguably these fines, if the FDA ever actually musters up the gumption to impose them, are a slap on the wrist.

But will the FDA use them? The FDA’s number of enforcement letters has dwindled to a trickle over the past 8 years. This year, letters have hit an all-time low: While the FDA has issued 14 letters so far in 2007 concerning promotions to physicians, here’s how many they’ve issued to drug companies regarding direct-to-consumer ads:

One!

That was a slap on the wrist for Takeda Pharmaceutical’s ad for the sleep aid Rozerem — and even calling it a slap on the wrist is perhaps overstating it — the ad had a “back to school” theme (i.e. August/September) – and the FDA’s letter was issued in March!

Perhaps the fees that the FDA is now able to collect from drug companies for reviewing drug ads (a power also gained under the recently-enact FDA Amendments Act) will permit the FDA to hire more advertisement reviewers (right now they are woefully understaffed, given the 50,000+ promotional materials filed with the FDA every year). That in and of itself will not mean that the FDA will use its new powers… Only political will can do that, and so far there’s precious little evidence of that at the FDA…

Here’s the FDA’s letter:
Here’s the promotional mailer they were concerned about.

Hat tip: Forbes

P.S. The mailer asked Physicians receiving it to fill it out a survey — in exchange for which they’d receive this handsome simulated leather letter tray! Classy… And oh so “practice related.”

The FDA Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising, and Communications has issued one of its increasingly rare enforcement letters, calling Eli Lilly (NYSE:LLY) to task for overstating the efficacy of its drug Cymbalta in a “professional mailer” sent to physicians. The letter said:

This mailer is false or misleading in that it overstates the efficacy of Cymbalta and omits some of the most serious and important risk information associated with its use. Therefore, the mailer misbrands the drug in violation of Sections 502(a) and 201(n) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (Act), 21 U.S.C. 352(a) and 321(n), and FDA implementing regulations.

Cymbalta: FDA Liver Damage Warning Video:

Sending so-called “untitled” letters, like this one, and the theoretically more serious “warning letters” have traditionally been the FDA’s only power to do anything deceptive drug advertisements and promotional materials. Under the FDA Amendments Act of 2007 recently signed by President Bush, the FDA has gained the power to impose monetary “civil penalties” for violations of the regulations concerned drug ads — up to $250,000 per violation, (“up to” being the operative words here) maxing out at $500,000 for a single company in a three year period. Arguably these fines, if the FDA ever actually musters up the gumption to impose them, are a slap on the wrist.

But will the FDA use them? The FDA’s number of enforcement letters has dwindled to a trickle over the past 8 years. This year, letters have hit an all-time low: While the FDA has issued 14 letters so far in 2007 concerning promotions to physicians, here’s how many they’ve issued to drug companies regarding direct-to-consumer ads:

One!

That was a slap on the wrist for Takeda Pharmaceutical’s ad for the sleep aid Rozerem — and even calling it a slap on the wrist is perhaps overstating it — the ad had a “back to school” theme (i.e. August/September) – and the FDA’s letter was issued in March!

Perhaps the fees that the FDA is now able to collect from drug companies for reviewing drug ads (a power also gained under the recently-enact FDA Amendments Act) will permit the FDA to hire more advertisement reviewers (right now they are woefully understaffed, given the 50,000+ promotional materials filed with the FDA every year). That in and of itself will not mean that the FDA will use its new powers… Only political will can do that, and so far there’s precious little evidence of that at the FDA…

Here’s the FDA’s letter:
Here’s the promotional mailer they were concerned about.

Hat tip: Forbes

P.S. The mailer asked Physicians receiving it to fill it out a survey — in exchange for which they’d receive this handsome simulated leather letter tray! Classy… And oh so “practice related.”

Eli Lilly’s simulated leather tray

 

 

StatCounter - Free Web Tracker and Counter

 
Does Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas, get paid by the drug companies to push their drugs on you, if you need them or not, yes he does look below:

The real truth about the money paid to Cathal Grant by the drug Companies

Notice Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas is paid by Eli Lilly, Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca, Cephalon, GlaxoSmithKline, and Pfizer to push their drug in our opinion it is clear what Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas is doing, prescribing drug if you need them or not.

Doctors Paid Big By Drug Companies?

One patient statement about Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas:

“We found out that he gets paid to speak for almost every drug company out there, even if the drugs are competitors. He is out to make the money and it is apparent the way patients are herded through the practice with no regard for the patient’s needs. Beware if he tries to prescribe you a “new” drug on the market, it probably means they are paying him now. “

 

In our experience Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas, does not tell you one big fact that you the patient has and that is Informed Consent, Dr. Cathal P Grant MD, Bedford, Texas, does not discuss this or wants you to know about this, in our experience so he can get you hooked on psychotropic medications so you can do nothing but feed you greed for money, and you do not care at all what you do to the patient’s life.

This video proves what we are saying in our opinion about Cathal Grant’s medical practice, it also shows how Cathal Grant does not want you to have informed consent in your visit with him, and he does not tell you the truth, as the video below shows:

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*